Your Guide to What Home Appraisers Look for – And What They Don’t Look For

Your Guide to What Home Appraisers Look for – And What They Don’t Look For

Many homeowners waiting for a home appraisal feel understandably anxious about what to expect. What will the appraiser look for? What do they not care about? How long does the process take? Depending on your property, its condition, and its size, it could be just 15 minutes or take hours. Keep reading to find out what they are looking at, and then contact Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties at 310-373-0021 if you need tips to sell your home.

External Factors the Appraiser Will Look At

You can count on your appraisal report, including many external factors of your property. These are factors you have no control over, such as the census tract in which it is located, the boundaries of the neighborhood, and the legal description of your property.

Other external factors they will consider include whether your neighborhood is urban, suburban, or rural, and how much land is used for various purposes in the neighborhood (for example, single-family homes versus retail and multifamily properties). The appraiser will determine the zoning classification, lot size, public utilities on the property, driveway surface, and car storage.

Internal Factors the Appraiser Will Look At

Inside, the appraiser is going to consider things like your home’s square footage, how many bedrooms and bathrooms it has, how updated or old the kitchen and bathrooms are, what type of foundation it has, if there is a full or partial basement, if there are crawlspaces or an attic, what materials were used for the windows, floors, and walls, and evidence of termites.

How the Appraiser Determines the General Condition of the House

Of course, the appraiser is going to consider the general condition of the house. To determine that, they will take into account the materials the floors, walls, and trims are made with, the material and condition of the exterior walls, foundation, roof, screens, gutters, and downspouts, general maintenance issue (such as leaky faucets), and physical issues that affect the livability of the home or its structural integrity.

What Appraisers Are Not Looking For

In short, when an appraiser is looking at a home, they are not considering any movable features or décor. For example, while it might be a good idea to paint your walls neutral colors to sell it more quickly, the appraiser will not consider the color of the walls, whether new shutters have been installed, or even if ceiling fans have been added. A general rule of thumb is that if you can remove an item by simply unscrewing or unbolting it, it is personal property and will not be considered during an appraisal.

Do you have questions from your local real estate professionals? Do you want to know how to prepare for your home’s appraisal? Then contact Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties at 310-373-0021 at your convenience.